Tag Archives: pink

Girlie Hat, aka the Hipster Beanie or Granny Hat (Free People Inspired)

This is a quick and easy pattern for the kind of slouchy, bad-hair-day-covering beret that is sometimes known as the Hipster Beanie. Slouchy beanies are comfy as hell and keep your ears warm without seriously squashing your hair. They also look good on most people, including those that “can’t pull off hats.” Trust me, I am one of those people that look absolutely ridiculous in most winter headgear and I still feel foxy as Betty White in this bad boy.

This model is plain and simple, modeled after the Vintage Tam Rose Beret which was voted a “Customer Favorite” on  Free People. The Girlie Hat is also the soft, feminine cousin of the more fitted Manly Hat. I am all about His & Hers.

Any DK weight yarn works for this project. I used Patons Classic Wool in Water Chestnut. Use a 5.5 mm hook, or one size up from what the package recommends for a crochet project.

Dimensions: 26.5 cm/approx. 10 inches across.

Abbreviations: DC = double crochet, sl st = slip stitch, DCtog = Double crochet together. SC = single crochet. To DCtog: *Yarn over, insert hook in next stitch, yarn over, draw yarn through stitch, yarn over, draw yarn through 2 loops on hook* twice, yarn over, draw yarn through 3 loops on hook.

Begin using the “Magic Loop Method“. Chain 3 as first DC, DC 11 into ring. Join with a sl st in top of first chain. (12 DC).

Row 2: Chain 3, make 2 DC in next stitch and in next 10 stitches. Make another DC into the loop with the first chain of 3. Join with sl st in top of first chain. (24 DC).

Row 3: Chain 2, *make 2 DC in next stitch, 1 DC in following stitch* all the way around. Join with sl st in top of first chain. Using a turning chain of 2 only makes a smaller gap in between rows. (36 DC).

Row 4: Chain 2, DC in next stitch. 2 DC in following stitch. *DC once in each of next two stitches, 2 DC in next stitch* all the way around. Join with sl st in top of first chain. (48 DC).

Row 5: Chain 2, DC in next two stitches. *2 DC in following stitch, DC once in each of next three stitches* all the way around. Join with sl st in top of first chain. (60 DC).

Row 6: Chain 2, DC in next three stitches. *2 DC in following stitch, DC once in each of next 4 stitches* all the way around. Join with sl st in top of first chain. (72 DC).

Row 7: Chain 2, DC in next four stitches. *2 DC in following stitch, DC once in each of next 5 stitches* all the way around. Join with sl st in top of first chain. (84 DC).

Row 8: Chain 2, DC in next 5 stitches. *2 DC in following stitch, DC once in each of next 6 stitches* all the way around. Join with sl st in top of first chain. (96 DC).

Row 9: Chain 2, DC in next 6 stitches. *2 DC in following stitch, DC once in each of next 7 stitches* all the way around. Join with sl st in top of first chain. (108 DC).

Row 10: Chain 2, DC in next 7 stitches. *2 DC in following stitch, DC once in each of next 8 stitches* all the way around. Join with sl st in top of first chain. (110 DC).

Row 11-12: Work even. The hat will look like a very large pancake at this stage. Not to worry.

Row 13 and 14: Ch 2, DC in next 4 stitches. *DCtog, 1 DC in each of next 5 stitches* all the way around.

Row 16: Work even.

Row 17: Ch 1, SC in BACK LOOP ONLY of each stitch all the way around. Join with sl st.

Row 18 and finishing: Work even for 1 inch in SC. Fasten off.

Try on the hat to see how it fits, then wet block. Tack on an embellishment of your choice and enjoy. I like a big brooch, or you can try a bow like this one from creativeyarn (I made mine slightly  larger).

::Note:: I improvised this pattern and wrote the instructions later. Toward the end, the stitch count on my actual hat differs a bit from the pattern here. If anything, the pattern is more symmetrical. It’s meant to be a sloppy hat, so just go with it.

::Note:: This is the same concept as the Manly Hat, and most hats really. Whatever number of stitches you start with, you want to increase by that number of stitches every round. This should make a nice, even, slightly curved piece of fabric that looks like a yarmulke. When the thing is wide enough to fit on your melon, begin to work even. This should cause the edges to roll slightly inward, bringing that nice even yarmulke shape into a dome.

If your hat is coming out too big, try starting with 10 stitches, or even 8. Also, you can make Row 16 another decrease row. Instead of working even, DCtog every 5 stitches.

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Hot Little Handwarmers

I have a craft crush on creativeyarn’s blog. I will admit it. She whips up handwarmers and crocheted necklaces like nobody’s business AND shares a bunch of her patterns with all the world.

I just finished a pair of her “Emerald Green Handwarmers,” which are little fingerless gloves worked up flat and then sewn together. Her pattern does not taper at all, meaning it’s the same width at the wrist as it is through the hand and fingers. This did not fit me at all, so I tried altering it a bit. I  still love this pattern, and should note that I also didn’t swatch and I have very small hands. AND I used acrylic yarn, so most of the problems I had could have been solved with some good blocking. So give her pattern a whirl, with or without my changes. I added some shaping and an edging around the thumbhole, and switched the yarn to a flaming hot pink.

Cast on 28 stitches, leaving a long tail for sewing seam later.

Work in moss stitch (row 1, knit 1, purl 1 all the way across. row 2, purl 1, knit 1 all the way across) for three rows. Work in stockinette for 11 rows, ending with a knit row.

Purl 5, increase one using bar increase made purlwise. *Purl 4, increase one stitch using bar increase made purlwise*  all the way across. At least, I think this is what I did. You want to increase 5 stitches spaced out evenly across your last stockinette row.

Continue according to creativeyarn’s pattern, working with 33 stitches. Bind off loosely in pattern leaving a very long tail for sewing AND thumbhole. (note: if you have little hands, I recommend doing only 5 repeats of the pattern.)

To make thumbhole:

Starting from bottom and using long tail left over from cast-on, sew first 2 inches of seam shut.

Starting from top and using long tail from bind-off, sew 2 inches of seam shut. Switch to a 5.00 mm crochet hook and pick up stitches around open thumbhole. This is a little tricky as the edge won’t be perfectly even. You should have around 15 stitches. Chain one, and single crochet all the way around twice. Do not chain one at the beginning of round 2, just work in a spiral. Snip excess yarn, pull end through, and weave in all ends.

Love!

DIY – Raspberry Parfait Slippers

I have recently gotten back into crafting as a way to keep my sad little hands busy while I’m away from my man. A friend introduced me to Ravelry, and I found the CUTEST little pattern for Mary-Jane style slippers.

I think these are absolutely precious. Her pattern is darling and should work, but I made a few changes to the pattern which I’ll explain below. I’m writing these changes assuming that readers have looked at her pattern first, so check it out here.

First, I scaled down the size. I have baby feet, borderline size 6. The easiest way to shrink these is to start with 6 stitches in your ring instead of 8. I imagine for a size medium you’d start with 7, or a larger size start with 9. Increase like the pattern says (2 dc every stitch in round 1, 2 dc every other stitch in round 2, every 3rd stitch in round 3, etc.) Just use multiples of 6 instead of 8. You should now end your increase rows with 24 stitches instead of 32.

For the footbed, work the first 17 stitches instead of 23 (the number of stitches in round 3 minus 1).

When making the loop, I opted for a single crochet chain. This is very easy… when you get to the spot where you’ll place your loop, make one single crochet, then begin a crochet chain of about 25 stitches, and anchor in place with your next single crochet in the following stitch. You should have a neat loop. Continue around as the pattern says.

For yarn, I used Red Heart Super Saver in Shocking Pink held together with Louisa Harding Yarns Kimono Angora Pure in 4, a pretty raspberry color. Don’t knock this combo until you try it. The Red Heart acrylic adds bulk and durability, while the Kimono is beautifully soft but would not hold up well as a slipper by itself. Together they make a sturdy, warm, house shoe that should fluff up nicely with wear. I used some fluffy red scrap yarn for the edging, no recollection of what it’s called. I also upped the hook size to an I/5.50 mm, but I am a tight crocheter. I’m a fan of kitsch, and found these plastic heart buttons for 78¢ at Wal-Mart. 78¢!!! I am not kidding.

If you don’t want to slide around, decorate the bottoms with some puffy fabric paint and let dry.

These have the added bonus of being easy to finish in a day or two. Very cute for gifting!